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Thursday, 31 January 2013

Google And Audi ; Fully Self-Driving Cars by 2020






audi RSQ
Photo courtesy Audi.com


Well step aside Google: Audi has shown to the world that it can built its own self-driving car here at CES 2013, although engineers involved with the project say its most likely it will take another 10 years to develop and and get it on the road. Fully autonomous driving will come about one step at a time, and Ricky Hudi, chief executive engineer of electrics/electronics at Audi AG, during a press conference here. said “Our vision of piloted driving is when I don’t want to drive, I allow myself to be driven”. 



High-performance assistance systems already help drivers reach their destinations safely and more calmly. Bosch is set to expand its range of driver assistance systems in the years to come. In the future, these systems will take on a growing role in guiding vehicles through highway tailbacks. More specifically, they will brake, accelerate, and steer completely autonomously.
Bosch is developing functions that automatically brake, accelerate, and steer vehicles on highways. Initially limited to traffic jams, autonomous driving will increasingly be possible with increasing levels of automation and at ever higher speeds.


google car, self-driving car, autonomous car, accident prevention, auto industry, automakers, autonomous vehicle

California is the latest state to allow testing of Google's Fully Autonomous Driving cars on the streets of California, but with one exception only with a human passenger along as a safety measure.

Gov. Edmund "Jerry" Brown signed the autonomous-vehicles bill into law last month with Google co-founder Sergey Brin and State Sen. Alex Padilla, who authored the bill, at Google's headquarters in Mountain View, California. 
The bill, SB 1298, will set up procedures and requirements for determining when the cars are road-ready.
Google co-founder Sergey Brin hopes that self-driving cars will be able to drive on public streets in five years or less. I think he is a little optimistic Google co-founder Sergey Brin as most experts feel its more than 10 years to develop a fully Self-Driving car.
Imagine how impressive it will be to see a  blind man that can travel behind the wheel of one of the web giant’s self-driving cars. 



Autonomous cars were recently legalized in California and Google became the first company to gain the legal right to test self driving cars Nevadan roads.

 The concept of self-driving cars has been with us for over 50 years thanks to the Hollywood . And I am not  talking about cars that know how to change lanes doing 60 M.P.H. or stop a stops sign or flicker as we do a left or right turn , In Hollywood self-driving cars don't just drive. They jump over walls, carry on conversations with their driver, repair themselves, and even help Bruce Wayne fight crime.

Will See in Decade from now!







Less stress during traffic jams
Bosch works on autonomous driving
PI7986 - 09. January 2013
Assistance systems autonomously guide vehicles traffic jams
Bosch offers all the required components and sensors from a single source
First steps on the way to fully autonomous driving



press release
Further information is available online at www.bosch.com and www.bosch-press.com.

High-performance assistance systems already help drivers reach their destinations safely and more comfortably. Such systems control speed and the distance between vehicles. They also warn drivers of traffic jams and help them maneuver into even the tightest of parking spaces. Bosch, the global supplier of automotive technology and services, is set to expand its range of driver assistance systems in the years to come. In the future, these systems will take on a growing role in guiding vehicles through traffic jams.


Bosch is developing functions that automatically brake, accelerate, and steer vehicles on highways. Initially limited to traffic jams, autonomous driving will increasingly be possible with increasing levels of automation and at ever higher speeds. 
source Bosch.com




More specifically, they will brake, accelerate, and steer completely autonomously. The traffic jam assistant will step in when the vehicle is moving at speeds between 0 and 50 kilometers per hour. This means that it will operate in most stop-and-go traffic situations. According to the German motor club ADAC, the total length of tailbacks in Germany alone amounted to 405,000 kilometers in 2011. “The traffic jam assistant helps drivers arrive more relaxed at their destination, even in dense traffic,” says Gerhard Steiger, president of the Bosch Chassis Systems Control division. The first generation of the traffic jam assistant is expected to enter series production in 2014. In the following years, the feature will be enhanced to cover ever-faster speeds and more complex driving situations. Eventually, the traffic jam assistant will serve as a highway pilot, making fully autonomous driving a reality.



Bosch works on autonomous driving

High-performance assistance systems already help drivers reach their destinations safely and more calmly. Bosch is set to expand its range of driver assistance systems in the years to come. In the future, these systems will take on a growing role in guiding vehicles through highway tailbacks. More specifically, they will brake, accelerate, and steer completely autonomously.


Today, adaptive cruise control already tracks the vehicles ahead and adapts the distance and speed of the driver’s own vehicle accordingly. Acting in combination with the ESP® system and with the additional support of lane-detection cameras and electromechanical steering, this forms the technical basis for autonomous driving. High-performance software now calculates the appropriate driving instructions for a safer and less stressful driving. Automatic lane changing is the next functional step. It calls for two additional features. First, a rear-mounted radar sensor that also detects fast-approaching vehicles and, second, a dynamic navigation map. Such maps, which operate via a mobile network connection, can keep drivers informed of current roadwork sites and local speed restrictions. And although drivers remain responsible for driving, they can limit themselves to monitoring the actions of the driver assistance system.


Level of automation continues to grow
“Fully autonomous driving will come about one step at a time,” Steiger says. At first, driving on highways with an ever greater degree of automation and at ever higher speeds will be possible, until the highway pilot can take over the entire trip. Two major challenges remain. First, inner-city driving, since automated vehicle functions have to deal with dense traffic involving a large number of road users traveling in every direction. Second, developing a concept to ensure that the system’s functions operate reliably in all types of driving situation.





Pictures Of  the I-ROBOT CAR
courtesy of AUDI.COM


audi RSQ
Photo courtesy Audi.com



audi RSQ
Photo courtesy Audi.com


Photo courtesy Audi.com